Tag Archives: berger

Belated Reports from the Field: Berger and Burnett Inform my Trip to the 2012 Vernacular Architecture Forum Conference

The second weekend in June I attended the Vernacular Architecture Forum Conference in Madison, WI. It was, owing to the topic, a considerably analog affair. At the risk of being obvious, vernacular architecture is exactly like vernacular language; only here the text is the built environment. It subsumes everything from housing to bridges to farm buildings to gas stations, and so on, and scholars are particularly interested in it for its reification of cultural landscapes. And while we read Berger (1977) and Burnett (2004) in terms of the digital humanities, I was struck by how much this Forum’s particular object of scrutiny underscores both Berger and Burnett’s writings. [Sidebar: I study cultural landscapes, as well, but my primary reason for being there was to take a very nerdy vacation. It was time very well spent.]

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Filed under Quotidian, Scholarship, Travels

A grateful farewell to IML 500…that also reads as some Burnett-based kvetching

The last four and a half weeks whizzed by. In the process we learned Photoshop, Premier, and (behold!) WordPress. I thank our Professors Holly Willis and Vicki Callahan, my classmates, and the hired guns at Lynda.com. For what it’s worth, I consider Photoshop to be the hardest. I realize many of the terms borrow from photography, but the application of said terms? I’m not so sure. But I’ll not decry the Photoshop! I have too much fun using it to make this blog’s headers. So much so that I worry about future procrastination projects, wherein I toil away at making 770 x 200 images just so when I ought to be writing up on Out the Window, or even transferring and tagging (hurray, tags!) my annotated bibliographies. As Burnett (2005) says, our archives look differently now. The role of the image extends beyond mere illustration. Images are now the central actors in archives, providing “visualizations of thinking, feeling, seeing, and knowing” (77).

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Filed under Scholarship